Karen DeWitt

Capitol Bureau Chief at New York State Public Radio

Karen DeWitt is Capitol Bureau Chief for New York State Public Radio, a network of 10 public radio stations in New York State. She has covered state government and politics for the network since 1990.

A regular contributor to 'New York NOW,' she frequently appears on the Reporters' Roundtable segment and often interviews newsmakers.

Karen previously worked for WINS Radio, New York, and has written for numerous publications, including Adirondack Life and the Albany newsweekly Metroland.

She is a past recipient of the prestigious Walter T. Brown Memorial award for excellence in journalism from the Legislative Correspondents Association and was named Media Person of the Year for 2009 by the Women's Press Club of New York State.

Karen is a graduate of the State University of New York at Geneseo.

Karen at a Mike Bloomberg press conference in Albany.

Karen interviewing SUNY Chancellor Nancy Zimpher

Ways to Connect

Matt Ryan / WMHT

It looks like New York Senator Chuck Schumer will be re-elected to a fourth term on November 8th ,barring any major turn of events. Schumer is nearly 40 points ahead of his nearest opponent in the polls, and the bigger question now is, will Schumer be the next Senate Minority Leader or Majority Leader?

Matt Ryan/WMHT

Hillary Clinton’s widening lead over Donald Trump, is likely to affect down ballot races for Congress , where there are several contested seats, and for control of the State Senate in New York, where Republicans are barely clinging to the majority .

Matt Ryan / WMHT

Governor Cuomo took a step deeper into the partisan politics of the State Senate Tuesday night, telling two Democratic factions they’ll have to work together if the November elections go their way.

After several years of budget surpluses, New York state tax revenue is coming in at a lower-than-expected rate.

Karen DeWitt

With less than three weeks before elections, Hillary Clinton is even further ahead of Donald Trump in New York State, and that could affect down-ballot races, including seats for the state Senate.