Karen DeWitt

Capitol Bureau Chief at New York State Public Radio

Karen DeWitt is Capitol Bureau Chief for New York State Public Radio, a network of 10 public radio stations in New York State. She has covered state government and politics for the network since 1990.

A regular contributor to 'New York NOW,' she frequently appears on the Reporters' Roundtable segment and often interviews newsmakers.

Karen previously worked for WINS Radio, New York, and has written for numerous publications, including Adirondack Life and the Albany newsweekly Metroland.

She is a past recipient of the prestigious Walter T. Brown Memorial award for excellence in journalism from the Legislative Correspondents Association and was named Media Person of the Year for 2009 by the Women's Press Club of New York State.

Karen is a graduate of the State University of New York at Geneseo.

Karen at a Mike Bloomberg press conference in Albany.
Karen at a Mike Bloomberg press conference in Albany.

Karen interviewing SUNY Chancellor Nancy Zimpher
Karen interviewing SUNY Chancellor Nancy Zimpher

Ways To Connect

Matt Ryan

Two more lawmakers, a former Senate Leader and the Deputy Majority Leader of the Senate were convicted of corruption in the past week. But Governor Cuomo continues to say it would not be a good idea to call state lawmakers back to the Capitol to enact more ethics reform measures.
 

Karen Dewitt

Supporters of paid family leave in New York say they hope 2016 will be their year, but business groups are urging caution.
 
A measure to allow all workers in the state 12 weeks of paid leave to take care of a new baby or sick family member was approved in the State Assembly, and two measures gained support in the State Senate, but the issue fell by the wayside in the end of session rush to pass bills and adjourn for the summer.
 

While supporters are declaring victory over New York’s new higher minimum wage for fast food workers, the action, by a state wage board,  highlights a larger question why are so many in the state dependent for their livelihoods on what are essentially entry level work force jobs.
 
The victory celebration by fast food workers and the state’s major union leaders also featured Governor Cuomo. The governor, who appointed the board when Republicans in the legislature were reluctant to act, predicts more actions to come.
 

A state wage Board has voted to phase in an increase in the minimum wage for fast food workers to $15 an hour,  making New York the first state in the nation to increase the wage for a single segment of the work force.
 

Karen Dewitt

Governor Cuomo’s Women’s Equality Act saw some successes in the legislature in 2015, after the most controversial of the measures, an abortion rights provision, was separated out from the rest of the items.
 
8 of the of the 10 provisions in the Women’s Equality Act passed in 2015, including anti human trafficking laws , protections for pregnant workers, broadening anti sexual harassment laws in the workplace, and making it easier for women to sue for equal pay, says the co –chair of the Women’s Equality Coalition, Suzy Ballantyne.    
 

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