Karen DeWitt

Capitol Bureau Chief at New York State Public Radio

Karen DeWitt is Capitol Bureau Chief for New York State Public Radio, a network of 10 public radio stations in New York State. She has covered state government and politics for the network since 1990.

A regular contributor to 'New York NOW,' she frequently appears on the Reporters' Roundtable segment and often interviews newsmakers.

Karen previously worked for WINS Radio, New York, and has written for numerous publications, including Adirondack Life and the Albany newsweekly Metroland.

She is a past recipient of the prestigious Walter T. Brown Memorial award for excellence in journalism from the Legislative Correspondents Association and was named Media Person of the Year for 2009 by the Women's Press Club of New York State.

Karen is a graduate of the State University of New York at Geneseo.

Karen at a Mike Bloomberg press conference in Albany.
Karen at a Mike Bloomberg press conference in Albany.

Karen interviewing SUNY Chancellor Nancy Zimpher
Karen interviewing SUNY Chancellor Nancy Zimpher

Ways To Connect

Matt Ryan

There’s word that the commissioner of the state’s environmental agency is leaving, just two days after Joe Martens issued the final environmental impact statement banning hydro fracking in New York. The final report on fracking is a signal for others to move on as well. Anti fracking groups say they are using New York’s stance to help convince other states, and even countries to ban the gas drilling process.
 

Matt Ryan

When Governor Cuomo and legislative leaders announced a new rebate check for property taxpayers, they touted it as a significant “real” benefit to average homeowners. But fiscal watchdog groups say the program is severely flawed, and the money could be better used on something else.
 

Karen DeWitt

A wage board appointed by Governor Cuomo, speaking before a packed crowd of fast food workers,  says it will authorize a “substantial” raise for fast food workers, but would not say when or even if the increase would be the $15 an hour that many groups are seeking.
 
A three member board picked by Governor Cuomo to examine whether fast food workers need a raise say they are in agreement that the current wage of $8.75 an hour needs to be much higher.
 

New York legalized gay marriage four years ago. State leaders reacted with enthusiasm to the Supreme Court ruling.

Governor Cuomo and leaders of the legislature finally settled all of their differences and were ready to vote on the final piece of legislation that will end the session.

The measure, colloquially known as “the big ugly,” contains a four year extension of the rent regulations, and a corresponding continuation of a property tax cap, as well as new rebate checks sent to homeowners just before Election Day 2016.

Governor Cuomo and legislative leaders held another news conference two days after announcing the elements of the deal, to put the best face on it.

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