Karen DeWitt

Capitol Bureau Chief at New York State Public Radio

Karen DeWitt is Capitol Bureau Chief for New York State Public Radio, a network of 10 public radio stations in New York State. She has covered state government and politics for the network since 1990.

A regular contributor to 'New York NOW,' she frequently appears on the Reporters' Roundtable segment and often interviews newsmakers.

Karen previously worked for WINS Radio, New York, and has written for numerous publications, including Adirondack Life and the Albany newsweekly Metroland.

She is a past recipient of the prestigious Walter T. Brown Memorial award for excellence in journalism from the Legislative Correspondents Association and was named Media Person of the Year for 2009 by the Women's Press Club of New York State.

Karen is a graduate of the State University of New York at Geneseo.

Karen at a Mike Bloomberg press conference in Albany.

Karen interviewing SUNY Chancellor Nancy Zimpher

Ways to Connect

After several years of budget surpluses, New York state tax revenue is coming in at a lower-than-expected rate.

Karen DeWitt

With less than three weeks before elections, Hillary Clinton is even further ahead of Donald Trump in New York State, and that could affect down-ballot races, including seats for the state Senate.  

Pipeline companies are not having a lot of success in New York so far in 2016, opponents say they are dirty and continue New York’s over-reliance on fossil fuels, and two projects have already been canceled.  A pipeline company representative says the projects are not as harmful as opponents say, and essential  for the state’s current electric needs.

Until recently, expanding and building pipelines was not terribly controversial, as most people agreed that there was a common need to transport oil and gas for fuel and electricity.

Karen DeWitt

State lawmakers with disabled children rallied at the State Capitol, along with developmentally disabled and their caregivers,  for more money in the budget to pay caregivers a living wage.

Karen DeWitt

Reform groups say in light of the criminal charges against some of Governor Cuomo’s former associates there are a number of changes that should be made to stop more corruption in the future.