natural gas

Matt Ryan/WMHT

In the past week, two major natural gas pipelines have been scrapped in New York. A third, which would expand a line that is near the Indian Point Nuclear Power plant, is still scheduled, but opponents are putting pressure on Governor Cuomo to use his persuasive powers with the federal government to stop the expansion.

Karen DeWitt

Fracktivists, as anti hydro- fracking activists are called, hope to play a role in New York’s Presidential primary. They are asking Democrats Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders, as well as Republican candidates, to take a stand against the Constitution pipeline and other natural gas pipelines, that if approved could criss- cross the state. 

Governor Cuomo says he won’t allow a natural gas transfer station to be built off of the coast of Long Island, saying  there are too many concerns, including damage form future hurricanes, and potential terrorism.  

The Port Ambrose transfer station was to be built off of  the beaches of Long Island, and would have allowed tanker ships to load up with liquefied natural gas,  then distribute the gas into pipelines on the main land.

Cuomo made the announcement to an enthusiastic crowd of Long Island officials and activists.

  Hydro fracking has been banned in New York State for nearly a year now,  but opponents of the natural gas extraction process have other concerns, including new pipelines.

Governor Cuomo is indicating he may very soon release a plan to begin limited hydrofracking in New York, but the state legislature left for the summer without acting on any  legislation that would speed up the process, or slow it down.
 
There have been reports for some time now that the  Cuomo Administration would soon  begin to allow limited hydraulic fracturing by gas drilling companies in  some  Southern Tier in communities  where most of the residents want fracking.
 

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