Business & Economy

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Business & Economy
2:49 pm
Fri December 19, 2014

Poll finds NYers are Scrooges when it comes to pay raise for state lawmakers

A new poll finds New Yorkers don’t want legislators to gain a pay raise if they agree to ethics reforms by the end of the year.

The Siena College poll finds that 63% of New Yorkers oppose a pay raise for state lawmakers, who earn a base salary of nearly $80,000 a year for what is technically a part time job.  Siena spokesman Steve Greenberg says voters also say, even though they would like to see reform measures as well as other issue resolved, they still don’t think legislators should be allowed to trade agreements on these items for more pay.

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Legislation & Policy
4:45 pm
Mon December 15, 2014

Major decisions on casinos, hydrofracking and Thruway tolls due before the end of the year

It’s looking less and less likely that state Senators and Assemblymembers will get a pay raise as a holiday present this year, but Governor Cuomo and lawmakers still have a number of issues they need to resolve before the year ends, ranging from the siting of gambling casinos to how to close a Thruway deficit and whether to go ahead with hydrofracking.

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Business & Economy
4:30 pm
Fri December 12, 2014

Wage board to decide min wage for tipped workers in 2015

A state panel is examining whether workers whose income is supplemented by tips should receive an increase in the minimum wage. The wage board, appointed by Governor Cuomo, has held hearings and will make a decision early next year.

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Business & Economy
3:09 pm
Fri December 5, 2014

Wine store sues the State Liquor Authority

Our feature story focuses on a battle between a popular Capital Region wine store and the State Liquor Authority. 

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Business & Economy
3:18 pm
Mon December 1, 2014

Comptroller warns: don't confuse $5b windfall with a surplus

State Comptroller Tom DiNapoli says the $5 billion dollar plus pot of money due to settlements with banks and other financial institutions over alleged wrongdoing in the Wall Street crash should not be looked at as a budget surplus.

“I wouldn’t call it a surplus,” Di Napoli said. “It’s really more a windfall.”

And so, the Comptroller says, it should not be used for recurring expenses, like tax cuts or increased school aid, as some legislators have suggested.

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